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Punchline’s Top Edinburgh Fringe Shows 2022

Hello! It’s been three whole years since a full Edinburgh Fringe and we’re getting the zoomies just thinking about it. We’ve got a right old mix of classics and new favourites. So let’s get stuck in…

Jayde Adams: Men, I Can Save You

Recently described by Helen Bauer as Queen of the Fringe, we just love everything Jayde does. She really is as good as her Fringe poster suggests. We want her to be our best friend in ‘Alma’s Not Normal’, and she’s got a tremendous singing voice, but live comedy is where she shines brightest.

8.20pm | Pleasance Courtyard (Cabaret Bar) | 3 – 28 August | Buy tickets


Larry Dean: Fudnut

Larry’s a bit of a superstar and one of the most exciting acts to come out of Scotland. This is stand-up at its very finest. He’s already f-ing amazing and he just gets better and better. He’ll make your night sparkle.

8.30pm | Monkey Barrel 3 | 4 – 28 August (not 16) | Buy tickets


Jessica Fostekew: Wench

Wench is the follow up to Hench, Jessica Fostekew’s 2019 hit show and one of our top shows EVER. 2022 brings the difficult second album and it’s another stunner. Smart comedy, beautifully written and full of belly laughs. Go and see this show.

4.45pm | Monkey Barrel 1 | 3 – 28 August (not 15) | Buy tickets


Nick Helm: What Have We Become

Nick Helm makes a mighty return to Edinburgh to feed the souls who have been starved of comedy. We don’t know the details, but we can confidently predict epic songs, visceral comedy and some spectacular surprises from the greatest showman.

5.25pm | Pleasance Dome (Queen Dome) | 3 – 28 August (not 17) | Buy tickets


Liam Farrelly: God’s Brother-in-Law

We’ve been waiting for Liam’s full Fringe show with bated breath. He’s won a bunch of awards which is impressive given that he’s only 21. Go and see this Paisley born superstar in the making in an intimate setting while you still can.

7.10pm | Just the Tonic Nucleus (Sub-Atomic Room) | 4 – 28 August (not 15, 22) | Buy tickets


Tarot: Cautionary Tales

Don’t be put off by the creepy poster, these guys are pure funny. All the classic sketch ingredients are there, with some extra toppings to keep you guessing. Whatever else you’ve planned, a joyful hour with this timeless trio is on the cards.

10pm | Pleasance Courtyard (Beside) | 3 – 28 Aug | Buy tickets


Jamie MacDonald: Reasonably Adjusted

Hands up who feels well-adjusted at the moment? Jamie finds the funny in all manner of places and reality doesn’t seem so bad when you’ve heard his take on it. This Fringe show preview aired in December 2019 and it was a corker then. Imagine what it’ll be like now!

7.45pm | Gilded Balloon Teviot (Sportsmans) | 3 – 29 August | Buy tickets


Lou Sanders: One Word: Wow

Lou is back! Another long-time Punchline favourite and top Fringe performer. You have probably enjoyed watching her shenanigans on Taskmaster but an hour with Lou live will be one of your most Fringey experiences. Entrust yourself to Lou and let her take you on a wild ride.

5.40pm | Monkey Barrel 3 | 4 – 28 August (not 17) | Buy tickets


MC Hammersmith: One Man Eight Mile

Throw away any ideas you have about improv because MC Hammersmith is in the house. It’s incredible watching him turn your suggestions into freestyle rap in front of your eyes. This self-proclaimed posh white man has been lauded by comedy fans and rap artists alike. Are you ready for this?

12 noon | Monkey Barrel (Hive 1) | 5 – 28 (not 8, 15, 22) August | Buy tickets

Read our interview with MC Hammersmith


Nish Kumar: Your Power, Your Control

If you feel lost amid the political chaos, let Nish help you find your feet and your funny bone. He’s one of the big names in political comedy and he’s here for a whole week. We can’t believe our luck.

9pm | Assembly George Square (Gordon Aikman Theatre) | 22 – 28 August | Buy tickets


Sara Barron: Hard Feelings

Can you joke about anything? Yes. But it takes a real expert. And oh baby does Sara Barron cover some BIG topics while making the audience fall about laughing. Dense themes with a light touch show this master at work. Don’t try this at home.

7.15pm | Pleasance Courtyard (Upstairs) | 3 – 28 August (not 17) | Buy tickets


Billy Kirkwood: Energetic

Billy Kirkwood is the personification of energetic, and this is the perfect antidote to the last few years. His 2021 show shone amid a depleted Fringe and transported us to another world. Laugh your cares away, worries for another day.

3.15pm | Scottish Comedy Festival @ The Beehive Inn | 5 – 28 August (not 8, 15, 18, 22) | Buy tickets


Ciarán Dowd: King Rodolfo

Get ready for another extravaganza of this off-the-wall Romantic’s antics. If you have followed Rodolfo’s illustrious career, you know you’re in for a spectacular, sweaty and swashbuckling treat. If you want an hour of pure escapism (and who doesn’t?) this is the show for you.

9.50pm | Pleasance Dome (Queen Dome) | 3 – 28 August (not 17) | Buy tickets

Read our interview with Ciarán


We’ll be adding more recommendations throughout the Fringe.

Please check dates and times with the venue before travelling as things change. If tickets are sold out at the venue or the Fringe Box Office, try the other one as they have separate allocations.


Punchline recommends Crybabies: Bagbeard

4 and a half stars
Crybabies: Bagbeard

Words by Suzy Romer

Comedy at the Fringe is all about freedom to be original, fun, daft and brilliant and this bumper sketch adventure has it all. Michael Clarke, James Gault and Ed Jones have the sort of acting talent that could easily have them popping up in great screen dramas for the rest of their careers, but they have other fish to fry.

While the first scene of the show runs like a classic stand-alone sci-fi sketch, it is in fact the prelude to a whole madcap story that sweeps us up and keeps us guessing (usually incorrectly) until the end. We follow the exploits of a heroic young scientist who longs for fame and fortune as a deserving goodie, but the plot thickens faster than custard until the Cool Guy with the Gun appears and then it really kicks off. As for Bagbeard, I can´t give you any spoilers but it´s a revelation worth waiting for.

There is no limit to the type or number of characters that these three performers can create, and the way they pull dramatic scenes out of ridiculous ideas is consistently impressive. There’s a great soundtrack and the imaginative special effects belie any space or budget restraints. The thrilling sense of chaotic fun is actually created with expert stage savvy, impeccable timing and costumes that are inventive and silly in equal measure. Occasional prop hiccups (I saw one of the preview shows) are met with smiles and a cheeky aside for the audience, which just makes us love them more.

It’s an utter delight to discover that nothing has stopped this group from preparing a high-energy show full of fun, glorious plot twists, silly puns, chewy one-liners, skilful slapstick and artistically justified running around in pants. I neither confirm nor deny that I had tears in my eyes as the story ended, but I can tell you I laughed more than I have in a long time and the audience laughed with me.


Click here to buy tickets for Crybabies: Bagbeard

5.50pm | Pleasance Dome (10 Dome) | until 28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Susan Riddell?

Susan Riddell

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Ren from “Ren and Stimpy”. I can relate to his twitching eye when Stimpy is snoring. 

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

A reviewer called me formidable which is funny cause I think I was just really tired. 

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I only know one joke. What’s pink and hard? A pig with a flick knife. That’s my go to. I can’t remember what age I was when I said that.  

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

Someone with a reassuring face.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

I don’t watch a lot of stand up so I don’t know anything by heart but I love Ali Wong’s new special and her terminology for lassies that date male comedians. In the UK they’re called gag hags but apparently in the U.S. they’re known as chuckle fuckers… which cracks me up.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

It’s very weird. I didn’t particularly enjoy doing stand-up pre lockdown but now I’m loving it and I still haven’t figured out why. There’s a lot more Scottish girls on the scene post lockdown. I’m really blown away by them all. Amanda Dwyer (hilarious) has started a monthly all female line up in Glasgow called “Material Girls” and all the lassies are bloody hilarious. It’s brilliant to see. 

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

Jen Kirkman’s “No fun”, “The Blind Boy Podcast” and Joanne McNally’s “My Therapist Ghosted Me”. 

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Making us all feel better about our shortcomings. 

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

My friend Rachel Jackson’s show “Almost Famous” about her quest to be famous while living with a debilitating mental illness. It’s hilarious and I think it’ll help a lot of people. The two of us are doing a one off sort of sketch show called ‘Whatever Happened to my Chow Mein’ on the 22nd at 5pm at Monkey Barrel. It’s something we’ve both wanted to do for years and we’re finally making it happen. It’s really daft, mad stuff.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

My show is called “Living My 2nd Best Life”, ’cause I hate the phrase living my best life. It’s all about not being where you thought you’d be in life at a certain age. It’s on at 8.10pm at Monkey Barrel Studio. It’s very light hearted and uplifting. No serious message. Oh, and I also explain why the Dalai Lama is a wee prick.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Mice laugh when you tickle them.


Click here to buy tickets for Susan Riddell: Living My 2nd Best Life

8.10pm | Monkey Barrel (Niddry St) | 4 – 28 August (not 15, 22)

How the devil are you, Tarot?

Tarot

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Any cartoon character that looks like an absolute ride is alright by us, e.g. Captain Bucky O’Hare, Marge Simpson, The Green Giant. Imagine a night with the lad off the Pringles tube. Wild. 

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant
for you?
 

“Wow! You’re driving all the way back to Wales now?! That’s impressive” it was significant because it was the 100th time we’d heard it from an act who refuses to gig south of the river in the city they live in. A real landmark.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?
Ed was roughly four and the joke was “Why did the farmer? Because the field.” Kath was ten and it was a rip off of Eddie Murphy’s homophobic RAW show that she now regrets, and Adam will let you know when it happens. 

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

100 mouths for laughing, 200 hands for clapping, 300 thighs for slapping, an extra-long excretion tube that’s already steeped in the toilet so they don’t have to leave halfway through for a waz. Oh and one enlarged heart that’s willing to let go and be swept away in the magic of it all. 

Maybe a penis too so there’s something easy to grab and pick it up by when it refuses to leave till we sign all its thighs at the end of the night.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?
“You won, Jane. Enjoy the money, I hope it makes you happy. Dear lord, what a sad little life, Jane. You ruined my night completely so you could have the money and I hope now you can spend it on lessons in grace and decorum. Because you have all the grace of a reversing dump truck without any tyres on. So Jane, take your money and get off my property.” 

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now
because of it? 

We missed the greenrooms. When you do comedy you get to hang out with the funniest people in the world. The gigs are great but the work colleagues really are top-notch or sexual predators.

Which podcast can you not live without?

Anything deep dive that lasts the 5-hour drive back from gigs (minus 40 minutes so we can whack on some incredibly loud punk/ 90’s chart toppers to chase away the snoozies).

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Comedy is great for giving people a direction in which to point their laughs so they don’t look unwell.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Chloe Petts, Grace Petrie, Sophie Duker, Jessica Fostekew, Sikisa, Josh Jones

Tell us about your Fringe show.

Not sure yet, we hear you shouldn’t be going if you can’t write it on the train up so we’ll drop you an update at 12.47 on August 29th as we climb aboard the hype (Edinburgh) train! 

Anything else you want to tell us?

Jet fuel can’t melt steel beams. 


Click here to buy tickets for Tarot: Cautionary Tales

10pm | Pleasance Courtyard (Beside) | 3 – 28 August

How the devil are you, Basil Brush?

I don’t know about you but we’re feeling a little bit starstruck… we got to interview BASIL BRUSH! Boom boom!

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

My favourite cartoon character is Bugs Bunny cos he had two teeth just like mine and when I was little I wanted to be as smart and naughty as him… and I liked his catch phrase ‘What’s up, Doc’ and he always came out on top.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

One of my best compliments I like to hear is when folks think they’ve heard the joke before and I say that’s good because I’m recycling and saving the planet, no seriously, recently I was described as a national treasure and I after 60 years in showbiz I’m humbled and thrilled that so many generations have grown up with my terrible naughty and mischievous jokes it warms the cockles of my brush… I’m a national treasure… do I get to live in the Tower of London?

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I was telling jokes at an early age, in fact I was born on stage, folks liked it so much my mother kept it in the act ha ha boom boom 💥

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

My ideal front row person would be any of my past misters, especially Mr Derek to give me a thumbs up and say ‘You’ve still got it Basil’… maybe a whole front row of them, oh and my mother cos she laughs at anything.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

I watch anything by Morecambe and Wise, I grew up with them and the André Previn routine with all the right notes being played but not necessarily in the right order is my all-time favourite.

Which podcast can you not live without?

I don’t listen to many podcasts but I latched on to ‘Just One Thing’ recently where if you could change just one thing in your life for the better what would it be and what is the benefit… I’m into health now I’ve hit 60 and I’m a vegan fox… good quality emissions… I get free entry into the ULEZ (Ultra Low Emission Zone) in London and can clear a room in 5 secs.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Comedy is a big stress buster… laughing more often is good for you and stop taking things too seriously… you must see all sides and comedy can diffuse many tricky situations… although Downing Street is the best comedy soap on telly at the moment.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

I’m looking forward to seeing Jimeoin again after beating him in the Edinburgh Fringe golf competition in 2019, and Michael Spicer after becoming a lockdown hit.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

I have two shows, Family Fun Show in the afternoon, exactly that, a show for the family with a little naughtiness… but water, cream pies and lots of silliness and audience participation; and then Unleashed and Uncut at 6.30pm… very naughty and is Graham Norton meets ‘Have I Got News for You’ meets ‘Crackerjack’.

Anything else you want to tell us?

It’s going to be boom boom

On the Fringe again, I’ve missed Edinburgh and look forward to wearing my kilt and going Commando!


Click here to buy tickets for Basil Brush’s Family Fun Show

12.30 | Gilded Balloon Teviot (Debating Hall) | 3 – 21 August


Click here to buy tickets for Basil Brush: Unleashed… And UnCut

6.30pm | Gilded Balloon Teviot (Debating Hall) | 3 – 28 August (not 4, 25)

How the devil are you, Ciarán Dowd?

Ciarán Dowd: King Rodolfo. Photograph by the awesome Idil Sukan (seriously, check out her other work)

He’s back! For anyone who’s followed Rodolfo’s illustrious career so far, you’ll know this is going to be a treat. If you want an hour of pure escapism (and who doesn’t?) this is the show for you.

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?
The Minions are the funniest little fellas, they get up to all sorts, always getting mixed up in some shenanigans. It’s great stuff.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

Edgar Wright once told me after a gig that I was “fucking funny” – and to hear that from the guy who made Spaced, which had been so formative for me growing up and wanting to get into comedy, felt very affirming/nice/cool/yummy. Also he came to the gig with Oscar Isaac, who’s a stone-cold babe and really added some glamour to the moment, but who kept his cards much closer to his chest. If I had to guess I’d say he thought my stuff was “weird” and I was “a man who looked too much like a potato”. Maybe I’m projecting.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

At secondary school it was fun to make the other students laugh but any mouthy little twat can get a reaction out of that mob, I realised if I could get the teacher to laugh that really felt like something. And that became my entire goal. In some ways I’m probably still just craving Mrs. Gallagher’s attention but I’m not sure she comes over for the festival, so what’s the fucking point of anything?

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

Short legs so they don’t encroach on my space. I like my space.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

As anyone who’s done tech on one of my shows and tried to follow along on the script will tell you, I barely know my own routines by heart. But when I was 13 I bought the DVD of ‘Tommy Tiernan: Live’ (there are more inventive names out there), and probably watched it twice a week for a year. If you put a gun to my head and said I had to word for word recite an hour of comedy I’d have a better chance with his show than one of my own.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now
because of it?

Well look, if I’d chosen to take a break for 2 years and done it on my terms it could have felt like a nice sabbatical and opportunity to recharge after what had been a full-on couple of years of work. But it didn’t feel like that because it came with the complete annihilation of everything I’d worked pretty hard to build over a lot of years, all momentum and trajectory were gone in a second and everything got shut down. So I think a lot of comedians are still sifting through the wreckage of that and wondering where they fit in the new landscape – looking at this year’s brochure it appears I fit in as some sort of grandad figure to all the new kids. But I value having an opportunity to create and be creative again and to have a platform and use for my stupidity; I don’t know that I value it more now, I’ve always felt very lucky to get to do this for a living, but I am very happy to be back and excited to perform in a way that maybe I wouldn’t have felt without the enforced suspension.

Which podcasts can you not live without?

I try to avoid the comedy ones – busman’s holiday. The only one I listen to every day is a
sports one called ‘Second Captain’s’ – they’re the best in the biz and it’s nice to think about
something else for an hour a day. Especially this close to the opening of a show when it can
become all-consuming.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Well it’s an entire industry whose sole purpose is to try and find joy in things and bring that
joy to people. Not many people doing that, comedians and doughnut makers. Not everyone
will like what you do and you may fail to achieve it – but the purity of the intention is nice I
think. Especially in a world so full of absolute bullshit.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Well they don’t need my endorsement after all the reviews, accolades and awards they’ve
already gotten for these shows but Liz Kingsman’s ‘One-Woman Show’ is the best I’ve seen in
a long time and Tim Key’s ‘Mulberry’ is phenomenal. Always love seeing Fin Taylor, Dan Cook,
Garrett Millerick, Pierre Novellie, and Glenn Moore. Also for my sketch roots a hearty
recommendation for ‘Crybabies’ and ‘Just These Please’.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s a follow-up to the character comedy show Don Rodolfo that I did in 2018. Follow-up, in
that it’s the same character, not that you need to have seen the previous shows. Rodolfo is a swashbuckling lothario and unrivalled buffoon who rises through the ranks of society to become King of England, he looks back over his inglorious reign as one of the most bloody, violent and sexy periods in history, and has to face his legacy, fatherhood, his own mortality and the baying mob at the gates. So it’s epic in scale but full of really stupid shit.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Just to say that this is the most ambitious show I’ve ever done, the scale, the set pieces, the
amount of funny in it, I’m really excited by it and I hope people will come along and really
enjoy it. And if you want see you there!


Click here to buy tickets for Ciarán Dowd: King Rodolfo

9.50pm | Pleasance Dome (Queen Dome) | 3-28 August (not 17)

How the devil are you, Yuriko Kotani?

Yuriko Kotani, Photograph by Karla Gowlett

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

There are so many but the anime I watched in the last few years and the characters I really love are Kyōjurō Rengoku from ‘Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba’ (both anime and the movie) and Bojji from ‘Ranking of Kings’. They are just incredible characters and I highly recommend to watch the anime if you haven’t. (They are adaptation of manga series so you can read manga too.)

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I was a kid. I cannot remember how old I was nor the first joke. But I remember I was enjoying making others laugh.

Describe your ideal front row audience member?

On a new material night. I’m hoping that new jokes that I’ve written will work and get laughs. I attempt the first new joke. And I could see the front row burst into laughter, huge laughs continues all the way through at every punchlines I’ve written. Some are crying as laughing too hard, and I see everyone’s happy faces. That’d be ideal.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

One of the comedy songs that was popular in Japan back then. I remember it was a cassette tape and we listened to it over and over again in the car. We sang together, and I was a really young kid but I nailed every single words (in my memory at least).

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I love online gigs too but perhaps one of the things I missed most in the last two years was the atmosphere that audience, acts and the venue create together in the room on that night. And I’m so looking forward to doing shows at Edinburgh Fringe again.

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

It’s ‘Poppy Hillstead Has Entered The Chat’. She is brilliant (and also I appeared on one of the episode as a character).

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Laughter! It is so crucial and important to have in the world.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

There are so many and I cannot choose, but if I may, one of the show I’d like to write here is ‘Katie Pritchard: Disco Ball’. I watched her show at a festival in March 2020 (yes, just before the lockdown) and I really enjoyed it. It’s her debut show this year and I cannot wait to watch her finished show. Another debut show that I’d like to watch this year at Fringe is ‘Rich Hardisty: Silly Boy’. We did preview on the same night in May 2022 and watched it – it was fantastic and I cannot wait to watch his completed show. And also my show. I have a good feeling and I hope you do too.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s called Yuriko Kotani: Kaiju About at 7:10pm from 3-29 August (not 15) at Pleasance 10 Dome. I’ve been working really hard to create this show. Please come and watch, and hope you’ll enjoy it as much as I do.

Anything else you want to tell us?

I’m really excited and cannot wait to go back to Edinburgh Fringe. If you’re coming to the Fringe, see you there!


Click here to buy tickets for Yuriko Kotani: Kaiju About

7.10pm | Pleasance Dome (10 Dome) | 3-29 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Stuart McPherson?

Stuart McPherson

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Tina from Bob’s Burgers. Anxious queen. Reminds me of my sister.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

I remember a teacher at school saying “I don’t worry about you, Stu.”. I don’t know if that even qualifies as a compliment, but it’s quite reassuring to be someone people generally aren’t worried about. I try and cling to that when I end up doing troubling shit where people should definitely be worried about me.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

It would be a Rikki Fulton or Morecambe and Wise joke, both of which I was obsessed with watching on VHS when I was like 3. Not a joke I’d understand myself, but the adults would lap it up and you have to play to the crowd in front of you. I was at least 4 before I started working on original material.

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

Between 5’4”-10”, average build, Ramones t-shirt, disposable income but didn’t come from money. Maybe took half a pill 40 minutes before, or had an amazing lunch / is newly in love.

Actually now I think about it, not to toot my own horn but, I made a woman in the front row on a hen do laugh her false eyelashes off and into her pint recently, she’s welcome back anytime.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

My most pointless skill is I have an uncanny ability to recall stand-up routines word for word. There are far too many to list here. Some of the classics I find myself badly rehashing after a few pints to some poor, disinterested and cornered person are: Paul F. Tompkins’ ‘The King Hat’, Patti Harrison’s ‘Dua Lipa song’, and Rory Scovel’s ‘Porch Fuck’ routine.

My good friend John “Aggers” Aggasild (City Cafe, 10.40am (you read that right)) is my new most often quoted though. You should see his show, or I’ll perform it at you badly.

Like a lot of people I know Peter Kay’s Manchester Arena DVD off by heart.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I missed hanging out with comedians and I missed being able to try out new ideas. I enjoyed the clean break and I do think it changed my perspective and made me chill out about the whole thing, which has probably improved my stand up more than 18 months of solid gigging would have.

I value days where I have no gigs and nothing expected of me a lot more now.

Which podcasts can you not live without?

‘What’s the Script?’ and ‘Some Laugh’, the 2 podcasts I co-host are the most important podcasts to me if we’re being literal here. Although, now I think about it I could easily live without having to watch some rubbish movie every week for WTS?

‘Top Flight Time Machine’ is my favourite podcast, alongside ‘Enjoy an Album’ & ‘Ralph Brown’s The Brown Jewels’.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Though I never want to be caught calling comedy “important” or anything in that vein, I do earnestly believe the only reason we’re here is to have a laugh, and stand up comedy provides that pretty consistently. Even if it’s an artificial form of it, it’s still good for you.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

As above, John Aggasild’s show ‘Welcome Back’ is one of the best and sweetest shows I’ve ever seen. So funny and thoughtful and well structured.

Krystal Evans’ ‘Kaleidoscope’ is such an incredible real life story. Krystal has loads of great jokes, it’s admirable that she’s chosen to tell this difficult story when she could have done something much easier. Even if it didn’t have any jokes, it’d be a good show.

Susan Riddell is just one of the funniest people in the world, she makes me laugh so much. She’s probably the most naturally funny person on the scene. I feel like you could wake her in the night and she’d do a good set. Susan’s show is called ‘Living My 2nd Best Life’ which encapsulates her vibe perfectly. I think she’s the only person on the circuit more half-arsed than I am, which I respect.

Amelia Bayler is always one of the most unique and fun acts to see. Her songs stick around my head for weeks and she’s a mad bastard. It’s cool to see someone’s act develop into something that feels so right for them, Amelia’s one of those people. Her show is called, wonderfully, ‘Greatest Hits’.

Hannah Fairweather is doing her debut show this year, and she’s one of the best newer acts out. I’ve seen her tell audiences the name of her show (‘Just a Normal Girl Who Enjoys Revenge’) and it get a laugh, that’s a good sign. She’s got lots of good stuff and I’m looking forward to seeing the full thing.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s a solid hour of jokes. It’s about loss and acceptance and how I take heed from my Gran’s words of wisdom and how I’m trying to keep her old Scottish Granny sayings alive through the oral tradition.

It’s basically just a funny show – I’m too needy to stand on stage and not try to get a laugh every 20 seconds. I feel ridiculous whenever I try to make a serious point. Hopefully there’s some hidden depth smuggled in like medicine in mashed potato.

It’s hard to see it objectively when it’s your own work but I do think it’s a fun show. I’m really looking forward to performing it every day.

Anything else you want to tell us?

No way man.


Click here to buy tickets for Stuart McPherson: The Peesh

4.55pm | Monkey Barrel Comedy (Carnivore) | 1-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Danielle Walker?

Danielle Walker

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why? 

I like that dumb rooster from Moana, it’s so stupid.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you? 

My Grandad once said ‘That’s the Mitchell in her’ about me (he’s a Mitchell), I loved that because I’ve always wanted to be like him, and it felt like he could see himself reflected back.

Also Anne Edmonds told me I have Funny Bones and I think she is the funniest person.

I just need approval I guess.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one? 

I’ve always told stories but some self awareness clicked in when I was 20ish around why people were laughing at the stories. I think I was telling a story about my mum and our vicious rooster (maybe that’s why I liked the dumb rooster from Moana, helped take away my fear)

Describe your ideal front row audience member. 

Laughing, smiling, not too hot so I don’t get flustered

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart? 

Technically not a comedy routine but in school one of the girls who wanted to be a country music singer would go from class to class singing this song about turkeys. She sang it everywhere for years and now I just think about that a lot, you have to sing it with the most extreme country twang.

Yeaaaahhhhh I hate turkeys

They gobble and peck

And gee and all heck

I’m really scared of turkeys

Yeaaaahhhhh I hate turkeys

That just repeats infinitely, you just get louder. I always think it’s the best comedy sketch I’ve ever seen.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it? 

I missed the buzz of new material, and seeing my friends bomb, nothing greater in the world than seeing your friend bomb terrifically.

I value my family and my time more now. 

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world? 

LOL’s

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe? 

Dan Rath: Cockroach Party

Tell us about your Fringe show. 

My Fringe show is about the process of trying to document my family. Every single one of them is a character, I have videos throughout the show of them because if not people don’t believe me when I talk about them.

Anything else you want to tell us?

My show hopefully has animatronics (pending everything travels well)


Click here for more information about Danielle Walker: Nostalgia

3.35pm | Assembly George Square Studios (Studio Four) | 3-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Sasha Ellen?

Sasha Ellen

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

I’ve always loved Princess Carolyn from Bojack. Amy Sedaris is great, I love a pun that isn’t a dad joke and her character was one that truly deserved a happy ending and got one. Sorry if that’s a spoiler; don’t worry, the rest of Bojack is impressively bleak.

If we’re talking children’s cartoons, as a kid I had a soft spot for Helga from ‘Hey Arnold’. There was just something about that blond, scruffy ball of rage and her complete inability to express her feelings for the object of her affection that just vibed with 10 year-old me… wait.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

When I was in primary school my favourite joke was “What’s the worst thing to be in the world? An egg: you only get laid once, you only get smashed once and the only bird who sits on your face is your mother”. I heard it from a friend at school and told that it a lot at parties. I had no idea what it meant. I think I just enjoyed watching adults trying to stifle a laugh. 

Describe your perfect front row audience member.

“I’d have to say April 25th. Because it’s not too hot and it’s not too cold. All you need is a light jacket.”

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

As a teenager, I watched Dylan Moran: Monster on repeat. I think I could probably still recite passages from that show.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I missed just being on stage, in front of an audience. I don’t think I’m gonna take stage-time for granted again. That and running into comedians I hadn’t seen in ages. I’ve learned that everyone has either left their partner of 100 years, got married to someone they met in lockdown or acquired a small person or animal. I’m quite enjoying running into people and playing baby, puppy or Fringe show.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

I’m doing a couple of shows this year: A solo show called Sasha Ellen: Creeps and Geeks and a comedy game show called Character Building Experience.

Creeps and Geeks is a one-woman stand-up show. In a nutshell, it’s a whimsical look at some creepy, creepy stuff. Mainly women’s safety. But in a fun way, I promise.

Character Building Experience is a joyful, quirky show that’s kinda like Dungeons and Dragons, but super simple version played for laughs. It’s pretty much comedians playing silly characters going on an adventure, occasionally making some questionable choices… constantly making questionable choices.


Click here to buy tickets for Sasha Ellen: Creeps and Geeks

4.15pm | Underbelly Bristo Square (Daisy) | 3-29 August (not 16)


You can also see Sasha in Character Building Experience

1.45pm | Laughing Horse @ The Counting House | 4 – 28 August (not 9, 16, 23)

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