How the devil are you, Stuart McPherson?

Stuart McPherson

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Tina from Bob’s Burgers. Anxious queen. Reminds me of my sister.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

I remember a teacher at school saying “I don’t worry about you, Stu.”. I don’t know if that even qualifies as a compliment, but it’s quite reassuring to be someone people generally aren’t worried about. I try and cling to that when I end up doing troubling shit where people should definitely be worried about me.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

It would be a Rikki Fulton or Morecambe and Wise joke, both of which I was obsessed with watching on VHS when I was like 3. Not a joke I’d understand myself, but the adults would lap it up and you have to play to the crowd in front of you. I was at least 4 before I started working on original material.

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

Between 5’4”-10”, average build, Ramones t-shirt, disposable income but didn’t come from money. Maybe took half a pill 40 minutes before, or had an amazing lunch / is newly in love.

Actually now I think about it, not to toot my own horn but, I made a woman in the front row on a hen do laugh her false eyelashes off and into her pint recently, she’s welcome back anytime.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

My most pointless skill is I have an uncanny ability to recall stand-up routines word for word. There are far too many to list here. Some of the classics I find myself badly rehashing after a few pints to some poor, disinterested and cornered person are: Paul F. Tompkins’ ‘The King Hat’, Patti Harrison’s ‘Dua Lipa song’, and Rory Scovel’s ‘Porch Fuck’ routine.

My good friend John “Aggers” Aggasild (City Cafe, 10.40am (you read that right)) is my new most often quoted though. You should see his show, or I’ll perform it at you badly.

Like a lot of people I know Peter Kay’s Manchester Arena DVD off by heart.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I missed hanging out with comedians and I missed being able to try out new ideas. I enjoyed the clean break and I do think it changed my perspective and made me chill out about the whole thing, which has probably improved my stand up more than 18 months of solid gigging would have.

I value days where I have no gigs and nothing expected of me a lot more now.

Which podcasts can you not live without?

‘What’s the Script?’ and ‘Some Laugh’, the 2 podcasts I co-host are the most important podcasts to me if we’re being literal here. Although, now I think about it I could easily live without having to watch some rubbish movie every week for WTS?

‘Top Flight Time Machine’ is my favourite podcast, alongside ‘Enjoy an Album’ & ‘Ralph Brown’s The Brown Jewels’.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Though I never want to be caught calling comedy “important” or anything in that vein, I do earnestly believe the only reason we’re here is to have a laugh, and stand up comedy provides that pretty consistently. Even if it’s an artificial form of it, it’s still good for you.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

As above, John Aggasild’s show ‘Welcome Back’ is one of the best and sweetest shows I’ve ever seen. So funny and thoughtful and well structured.

Krystal Evans’ ‘Kaleidoscope’ is such an incredible real life story. Krystal has loads of great jokes, it’s admirable that she’s chosen to tell this difficult story when she could have done something much easier. Even if it didn’t have any jokes, it’d be a good show.

Susan Riddell is just one of the funniest people in the world, she makes me laugh so much. She’s probably the most naturally funny person on the scene. I feel like you could wake her in the night and she’d do a good set. Susan’s show is called ‘Living My 2nd Best Life’ which encapsulates her vibe perfectly. I think she’s the only person on the circuit more half-arsed than I am, which I respect.

Amelia Bayler is always one of the most unique and fun acts to see. Her songs stick around my head for weeks and she’s a mad bastard. It’s cool to see someone’s act develop into something that feels so right for them, Amelia’s one of those people. Her show is called, wonderfully, ‘Greatest Hits’.

Hannah Fairweather is doing her debut show this year, and she’s one of the best newer acts out. I’ve seen her tell audiences the name of her show (‘Just a Normal Girl Who Enjoys Revenge’) and it get a laugh, that’s a good sign. She’s got lots of good stuff and I’m looking forward to seeing the full thing.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s a solid hour of jokes. It’s about loss and acceptance and how I take heed from my Gran’s words of wisdom and how I’m trying to keep her old Scottish Granny sayings alive through the oral tradition.

It’s basically just a funny show – I’m too needy to stand on stage and not try to get a laugh every 20 seconds. I feel ridiculous whenever I try to make a serious point. Hopefully there’s some hidden depth smuggled in like medicine in mashed potato.

It’s hard to see it objectively when it’s your own work but I do think it’s a fun show. I’m really looking forward to performing it every day.

Anything else you want to tell us?

No way man.


Click here to buy tickets for Stuart McPherson: The Peesh

4.55pm | Monkey Barrel Comedy (Carnivore) | 1-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Danielle Walker?

Danielle Walker

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why? 

I like that dumb rooster from Moana, it’s so stupid.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you? 

My Grandad once said ‘That’s the Mitchell in her’ about me (he’s a Mitchell), I loved that because I’ve always wanted to be like him, and it felt like he could see himself reflected back.

Also Anne Edmonds told me I have Funny Bones and I think she is the funniest person.

I just need approval I guess.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one? 

I’ve always told stories but some self awareness clicked in when I was 20ish around why people were laughing at the stories. I think I was telling a story about my mum and our vicious rooster (maybe that’s why I liked the dumb rooster from Moana, helped take away my fear)

Describe your ideal front row audience member. 

Laughing, smiling, not too hot so I don’t get flustered

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart? 

Technically not a comedy routine but in school one of the girls who wanted to be a country music singer would go from class to class singing this song about turkeys. She sang it everywhere for years and now I just think about that a lot, you have to sing it with the most extreme country twang.

Yeaaaahhhhh I hate turkeys

They gobble and peck

And gee and all heck

I’m really scared of turkeys

Yeaaaahhhhh I hate turkeys

That just repeats infinitely, you just get louder. I always think it’s the best comedy sketch I’ve ever seen.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it? 

I missed the buzz of new material, and seeing my friends bomb, nothing greater in the world than seeing your friend bomb terrifically.

I value my family and my time more now. 

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world? 

LOL’s

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe? 

Dan Rath: Cockroach Party

Tell us about your Fringe show. 

My Fringe show is about the process of trying to document my family. Every single one of them is a character, I have videos throughout the show of them because if not people don’t believe me when I talk about them.

Anything else you want to tell us?

My show hopefully has animatronics (pending everything travels well)


Click here for more information about Danielle Walker: Nostalgia

3.35pm | Assembly George Square Studios (Studio Four) | 3-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Sasha Ellen?

Sasha Ellen

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

I’ve always loved Princess Carolyn from Bojack. Amy Sedaris is great, I love a pun that isn’t a dad joke and her character was one that truly deserved a happy ending and got one. Sorry if that’s a spoiler; don’t worry, the rest of Bojack is impressively bleak.

If we’re talking children’s cartoons, as a kid I had a soft spot for Helga from ‘Hey Arnold’. There was just something about that blond, scruffy ball of rage and her complete inability to express her feelings for the object of her affection that just vibed with 10 year-old me… wait.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

When I was in primary school my favourite joke was “What’s the worst thing to be in the world? An egg: you only get laid once, you only get smashed once and the only bird who sits on your face is your mother”. I heard it from a friend at school and told that it a lot at parties. I had no idea what it meant. I think I just enjoyed watching adults trying to stifle a laugh. 

Describe your perfect front row audience member.

“I’d have to say April 25th. Because it’s not too hot and it’s not too cold. All you need is a light jacket.”

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

As a teenager, I watched Dylan Moran: Monster on repeat. I think I could probably still recite passages from that show.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I missed just being on stage, in front of an audience. I don’t think I’m gonna take stage-time for granted again. That and running into comedians I hadn’t seen in ages. I’ve learned that everyone has either left their partner of 100 years, got married to someone they met in lockdown or acquired a small person or animal. I’m quite enjoying running into people and playing baby, puppy or Fringe show.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

I’m doing a couple of shows this year: A solo show called Sasha Ellen: Creeps and Geeks and a comedy game show called Character Building Experience.

Creeps and Geeks is a one-woman stand-up show. In a nutshell, it’s a whimsical look at some creepy, creepy stuff. Mainly women’s safety. But in a fun way, I promise.

Character Building Experience is a joyful, quirky show that’s kinda like Dungeons and Dragons, but super simple version played for laughs. It’s pretty much comedians playing silly characters going on an adventure, occasionally making some questionable choices… constantly making questionable choices.


Click here to buy tickets for Sasha Ellen: Creeps and Geeks

4.15pm | Underbelly Bristo Square (Daisy) | 3-29 August (not 16)


You can also see Sasha in Character Building Experience

1.45pm | Laughing Horse @ The Counting House | 4 – 28 August (not 9, 16, 23)

How the devil are you, Randy Feltface?

Randy Feltface. Photograph by Andrew Levy

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Speak the capybara from the animated TV series ‘The Tick’ because he’s completely inconsequential and delightfully manky.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

“Nice face fuckhead”. It’s affectionately contradictory in nature and has stayed with me ever since Dame Judy Dench said it to me in passing at a charity gala. 

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I asked the obstetrician to put me back in. The midwife was pissing herself. 

Describe your ideal front row audience member?

Conscious. 

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

Every sketch in all 12 episodes of ‘Big Train’, and Patton Oswalt’s acceptance speech for Best Comedy CD at The 2006 Cringe Humour Awards.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Tine Del Twist: Caravan in the Sky, Michelle Brasier: Average Bear, Atsuko Okatsuka: The Intruder

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s a joyous exploration of our imminent extinction. 


Click here to buy tickets for Randy Feltface: Alien of Extraordinary Ability

9.15pm | Assembly George Square Gardens (Studio Two) | 3-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Robin Grainger?

Robin Grainger

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

I loved Asterix and Obelix comic books growing up and still do, to the extent that when I went to Paris, my girlfriend and I got tattoos inspired by France. She got a beautiful French phrase, “bonheur”which means “love and laughter”. I got a portrait of Asterix!

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

Aside from my mum or loved ones telling me they thought I was funny, whenever someone comes up to me after a gig and tells me I was funny. That is still the greatest compliment to me because they’ve paid to see you so the goal is to make them laugh as much as possible.

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I quickly realised I wasn’t the tallest or fastest or best at football or anything like that and the way to deflect from my perceived failings was to make people laugh. There’s an old VHS of my 7th or 8th birthday where I takeover a joke telling section to tell joke after joke.

Describe your ideal front row audience member?

I love when people are engaged in the gig and everyone forgets about their problems and the room becomes a theoretical front row, a community, and everyone is just invested and involved in laughing as much as possible without any feeling of being self conscious. I once made a guy spit crisps out of his mouth because he was laughing so much. That was a personal highlight for sure!

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

Anything Billy Connolly, Richard Pryor or Bill Hicks has ever done. My parents introduced me to them on TV when I was really young. I remember being 10 years old and watching Billy do the routine about the posh guy who was a professional toboganner and seeing my mum helpless with laughter and being amazed that one person could create that reaction.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I missed being on stage and hanging out with my mates at gigs. The thing I value most is that audiences are coming out and really need a good time after such a strange few years. People want to laugh and I value that. That, and the money.

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

There are so many podcasts that are incredible but the one I couldn’t live without is my podcast. I started doing it during lockdown and it helped keep me sane. It’s called ‘Starts Monday with Robin Grainger’ and I try to learn something new each episode and it descends into silliness. It’s available on all podcast platforms and to watch on YouTube.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Comedy’s greatest benefit for the world is that it brings people together and makes them happy and hopefully makes them forget about the stresses of life and not take things too seriously for a bit. The world is mad so go to your local comedy club and distract yourself for a bit.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

The Scottish Comedy scene and circuit in general is on such good form right now, audiences are spoiled for choice. Check out clubs like The Stand, Monkey Barrel Comedy Club, The Beehive, The Glee clubs, and support local nights as well. There’s someone for everyone so take a chance on someone you might not have heard of. Chances are they will be ace!

Tell us about your Fringe show.

I did my debut show ‘Dog Complex’ at The Stand  in 2019 about how getting a dog as a surprise birthday present changed my life. It was an amazing fringe run and I sold out a bunch of shows. I was all geared up to do my next show in 2020 about my own procrastination and how I, and perhaps we, always put things off. Then, hilariously, a global pandemic happened. So I got some extra time to write so the show is about using time wisely because you never know what might happen so it’s vital to be kind and not waste time. It’s really, really funny, there’s no serious stuff and the show is designed to make you laugh for as long as possible. I’m really proud of it.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Come and see my show! It’s on at The Stand Comedy club at 6.40pm from the 4th-28th of August and it will make you laugh a lot. Also, be nice to each other 🙂


Click here to buy tickets for Robin Grainger: Robin Time

6.40pm | The Stand | 4-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, MC Hammersmith (aka Will Naameh)

MC Hammersmith

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

I enjoy Elmer Fudd and Wile E Coyote. Both hell-bent on Sisyphean tasks. The futility to their endeavours is quite amusing, especially through an adult’s eyes.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

Numerous times I’ve walked onstage in Glasgow and people have shouted “Briefcase Wanker” at me. To me that’s a compliment, as it’s very much the image I try to radiate before I start rapping. I don’t have to try particularly hard though, in fairness.

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

I enjoy audience members who get involved, and joyfully throw me specific suggestions at the right intervals. I had a 90-year-old man in the front row of a gig recently, and converted him to understanding what hip hop was by the end of it. He seemed to enjoy it, despite the strong language. I also like audience members who laugh openly, as opposed to internally.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

Eddie Izzard’s “Do you have a flag?” routine regularly still plays on loop in my head. She’s made so many surreal masterpieces. And while it’s not a comedy routine, I could probably tell you every word of MC Juice and MC Supernatural’s freestyle rap battle from 1999. Some iconic punchlines from both of them.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

I definitely value the pace of face-to-face interactions a lot more. It’s tough to do crowd work on Zoom. Bad wi-fi really sucks the rhythm out of comic timing. On the flip side, a mute button for hecklers would be a welcome addition in real life.

Which podcast can you not live without?

The Bugle is a wonderful masterclass in bitter, depressing, acerbic rants. It’s also brilliantly funny. Andy Zaltzman is like a walking thesaurus.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Lily Phillips will have a great Fringe I think. And Sam Lake is doing his debut hour, he’s a nice young man with a head full of cake. Also, Baby Wants Candy will be bringing ‘Shamilton’ (their improvised Hamilton) to the Fringe this year, and I’m very excited about that. And my improv team is sharing a venue with Basil Brush, so I look forward to backstage chats with him.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

It’s called ‘MC Hammersmith: 1 Man 8 Mile’, and it’s an hour of improvised comedy raps based entirely on your suggestions. It’s got auto-tune, spontaneous rhymes, and it’s at The Hive at midday. If you’re an Edinburgh local, you’ll know why that’s worth mentioning.

Anything else you want to tell us?

The Hive is a classy establishment and I respect it greatly.


Click here to buy tickets for MC Hammersmith: One Man Eight Mile

12 noon | Monkey Barrel (The Hive) | 5 – 28 August (not 8, 15, 22)


You can also see Will in Spontaneous Potter: The Unofficial Improvised Parody

5pm | Gilded Balloon Teviot (Debating Hall) | 3 – 29 August (not 4)

How the devil are you, Sam Nicoresti?

Sam Nicoresti

If Sam’s answers are anything to go by, this show is going to be BRILLIANT. Go early as once word gets out you’ll be fighting to get a ticket…

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Wile E. Coyote. Hard to say why, but I always felt deeply sorry for him. He’s a talented mural painter, a resourceful inventor and a cunning strategist; but he’s a victim of his environment. His plans never malfunction through his own fault – he reads the Acme manual, he follows the instructions to the letter – they go wrong due to unreliable products and a cosmic misorder too large to comprehend.

The Road Runner passes through solid painted rock and runs across open air; traps don’t go off, tar doesn’t stick; but when the coyote expresses his incredulity at the fundamental laws of nature, putting himself into the place of the Road Runner to demonstrate what should have happened, reality snaps back with a stinging bite. It’s like Wile E Coyote’s true enemy is the universe itself. His tragedy is he doesn’t realise he lives in a cartoon until he finally looks down at the canyon floor.

Very entertaining!

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

One year for Christmas I received a book of Knock Knock jokes. I’m guessing I was around 5 or 6. I would take the book with me everywhere and read people the jokes to see what they made of it all. I liked the participatory aspect of the Knock Knock format. I liked that the audience had a stake in the success or failure of the joke. I think my mum confiscated it after a week.

Describe your ideal front row audience member.

Ideally a celebrity; any gender. Someone I have heard of, but wouldn’t be intimidated by (i.e. Chris Tarrant, Robert Webb). No one who’s going to draw too much attention away from me (i.e. Bono, Eamonn Holmes), but someone about whom other audience members will later say “Did you see…?” and “I can’t believe that was…!” (i.e. Buddha).

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

Everyone’s kinder now. That’s a subjective experience which may have more to do with my slightly altered standing within the hyper-partisan social scene compared to pre-pandemic, but I really earnestly believe people are just happy to be out and seeing each other again. It’s possible, I hope, that there’s a greater appreciation for the live scene and an enhanced respect for those who enrich it. I never used to gig because I hated the way comedians were, but there’s a nicer bunch of people around now and long may they continue to say hello to me.

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

I always enjoy Adam Buxton’s, and Jon Ronson’s latest one is great. I’ve been listening to ‘The History of Witchcraft’ which has a good balance of first-hand accounts and historical scene-setting, and recently a friend recommended ‘Bible Brothers’, where two comedy-writers attempt to read the bible cover-to-cover. I’m nearly at Exodus.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

It’s good to laugh. Health experts attest it strengthens core muscles and produces chemical reactions in the brain that make you feel closer to other human beings and more productive in your day labour. We need that, now more than ever. When we laugh, as monkeys, we’re showing submission. People will tell you this, you can research it yourself. But submission to what? Well, for me I believe it’s submission to the idea! You’re admitting you found the joke funny, and really great jokes are funny because they speak to something deeper within you than you assumed language could reach. At its worst comedy helps bring prejudices to light, and at its best it points out how ridiculous those prejudices are. It diagnoses and it heals. It’s also a great way to make new friends and relax after a long day!

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

I feel great about Joz Norris, Ania Magliano, Cerys Bradley and Sheeps! They all have such wonderful posters, which I think is essential. I’m excited to see Chloe Petts and Jen Ives, plus Ben Moor, Peter Fleming and John Kearns are all doing short-runs that I want to catch.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

My show is called ‘Cancel Anti Wokeflake Snow Culture’. One year ago I began to worry I was wrong about all my opinions and so I decided to engage with all the ‘right-wing/freedom of speech comedians’ on YouTube to see what their arguments actually amounted to. Then I got really ill, and then I came out as queer. The show is a surrealist-satire that examines that experience and attempts to catalogue, as honestly as it can, the inner-monologue of someone struggling with questioning themselves, battling their worst instincts, and trying to grow. It’s a patchwork of multimedia, film, animation, character and stand-up and it’s going to be great.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Drink plenty of water. I have a 4l bottle of water by my desk and I force myself to glug it. You don’t notice the change straight away but you snack less, your mood improves and your skin looks healthier. I glug my water and then I go for a meander around the corner and back once a day. These basic functions create an environment in which the brain is better primed to tackle larger issues like systemic injustice and the need for radical change within our corporate and political institutions.


Click here for more information about Sam Nicoresti: Cancel Anti Wokeflake Snow Culture

8.55pm | PBH Free Fringe @Banshee Labyrinth (Cinema Room) | 6-28 August (not 17)

How the devil are you, Helen Bauer?

Helen Bauer, Photograph by James Deacon

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

Do you remember the Disney pixar short ‘The Birds’, well the Big Bird in that that tries to make friends with all the little birds but get bullied by them then ends up surrounded by all of them naked (bird naked aka no feathers) yeah that bird is me.

What’s one of the best compliments you’ve received and what was it that made it significant for you?

Anytime someone says I am smart, like at the end of a pub quiz when you get an obscure 00s pop culture reference. That I love because I was never the ‘smart’ one at school so it feels great. Also when people say I have nice tits, yeah they are big and therefore can be annoying but it’s still great to be appreciated. THIS IS NOT A RESQUEST FOR MEN TO SLIDE INTO MY DMs THOUGH!

How old were you when you started telling jokes and can you remember the first one?

I can’t remember not doing it, it’s always something I loved doing, not exactly telling jokes but being the ‘funny’ one. I do remember very clearly not wanting to be funny one, thinking it wasn’t cute to guys so trying to be more serious and it never works out for me.

Describe your ideal front row audience member?

A row of completely basic babes with rosé in hand.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

I am one of those weird stand-up comics who has not watched much comedy apart from live in clubs. I can quote ‘Ab Fab’ though from heart!

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

The attention of course. I value every part of it more now. I really love people and the best thing for me to do with people is make them laugh. I’m so happy to be back.

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

Such a cliché but a love a true crime moment, every Monday when ‘Crime Junkie’ comes out I feel so excited at the prospect of a new horrific crime to listen to that I am genuinely concerned for my loved ones.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Making people smile about things that thought they were alone in feeling. It sounds so self-righteous but when you find out through a joke that your bizarre thoughts and habits are common it feels great. Everything from anxiety to finding hairs in your butt crack when you leave the shower after washing your hair!

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Looking forward to seeing Jordan Brookes’ new show and excited to see Catherine Bohart, Andrew White and Sophie Duker they are all amazing and I am obsessed. Also Jayde Adams new show looks incredible and she is always the queen of fringe for me.

Tell us about your Fringe show.

Madam Good Tit is my second full show. It is an hour about self-confidence, self-esteem and self-care. It’s the year of ‘self’ so I am taking it very literally. Taking care of yourself has never been more ‘in’. Inspirational quotes and facemasks are a big industry and, like all my basic friends, I am trying to ‘be the change I want to see’. However self-care like everything else is a money-making business. These self-care influencers get you when you are down and you are truly stuck. I have lost so many hours watching ‘Yoga With Adriene’ and I am really not convinced ‘putting yourself first’ is the best option for wellness.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Ahhhhh I am going on my first ever tour this September to November and I am so excited. ‘Madam Good Tit’ is heading to the Edinburgh Fringe and then going all over the country ending with a week at Soho Theatre. I cannot wait to take my own show around and see if I have a crowd in all the towns. Please come and say Hello! It’s more than a show, it is self care baby!


Click here to buy tickets for Helen Bauer: Madam Good Tit

5.40pm | Pleasance Courtyard (Bunker Two) | 3-28 August (not 15)

How the devil are you, Amy Matthews?

Amy Matthews

We’re back baby! Oh we have missed asking our favourite comedians our burning questions! Kicking off our 2022 questions is Amy Matthews:

Who is your favourite cartoon character and why?

A toss-up between Tina Belcher from Bob’s Burgers and Bertie from Tuca & Bertie. Both anxious queens.

Describe your ideal front row audience member?

A mixed-gender group of about 6 people or an ever-so-slightly mad older couple. Can’t even explain why, they’re just the two demographics that seem to have the nicest time.

Which comedy routines have you watched until you know them by heart?

When I was about 12 I could have answered that with the entirety of Lee Evans’ XL show. I don’t know what my answer would be today. I’m more susceptible to co-opting quotes or cadences from comedy tv shows than I am able to recite stand-up routines. I absolutely tore through ‘Stath Lets Flats’ and my internal monologue had a Greek-Cypriot accent for about three months.

What did you miss most about comedy in the last two years? What do you value more now because of it?

Aside from the obvious – the laughing together in a live setting – I value time in greenrooms much more. There’s something really nice about turning up in a strange city, walking backstage and there being a combination of familiar faces and new colleagues. And the new colleagues, (nine times out of ten), end up being new friends of some description. You experience an accelerated sense of kinship because you share this weird and wonderful job. Comics hanging out in a pub after a show look like the most bizarre mish-mash of folk. You can feel eyes on you wondering ‘how do these people know each other?’. We’re like the human equivalent of furniture in a hipster café – like, why are a chesterfield, a bar stool and a deck chair around the same table? The answer to both questions is that they all happened to be available in that area for a nominal fee.

Which podcast(s) can you not live without?

I go in phases with what I listen to, but at the moment it’s ‘Comfort Eating with Grace Dent’ – I love her and I love food and it’s got both.

What is comedy’s greatest benefit for the world?

Providing a space for shared experience. I know how much I love it when a comic has material about something that I thought quite particular to my own experience. Sharing that with a stranger – and surrounding strangers – is a little slice of magic. Also, silliness is underrated. In a culture of constant productivity and hustle and people trying to top-trump each other with their own idea of what cleverness looks like, to do or consume anything just for the sake of its inherent silliness is pretty radical and cool.

Which shows do you have a great feeling about at this year’s Fringe?

Amelia Bayler is doing a greatest hits of musical comedy bangers and her energy is a completely escapist tonic. She’s punk AF, I love her. Oliver Coleman is back from Australia with his show, ‘Sublime’ and I cannot wait to see him – he’s one of the most naturally funny and imaginative people I’ve ever known. Also, I saw a work in progress version of Rob Kemp’s ‘Agenda’ last year and it was phenomenal so I’ll definitely be going to see that in its finished form. It made me laugh so much that I didn’t mind one bit that the ending made me sob into my little can of coke and I had to go and sit down on a step for a bit.

Anything else you want to tell us?

I’ll be doing my show at Monkey Barrel at 2.35pm for the Fringe! I think you’ll really like it. The previews have been a lot of fun. It’s all about how external gazes shape how we act and feel about ourselves, which sounds a bit serious but there’s lots of very daft bits in it too. There’s a retelling of the plot of Amelie that you and friends and your enemies will really enjoy.


Click here to buy tickets for Amy Matthews: Moreover, The Moon

2.35pm | Monkey Barrel (Carnivore) | 4-28 August (not 15)

Fringe 2022

Hello! We’re busy creating lists of shows we want to see at this year’s Fringe, and of course we’ll be selecting our Top Shows for your delectation… coming soon.

We’ve also got some questions lined up for our favourite acts, and will be keep you posted with new discoveries as we go. This appears to be the year of the newcomer!

It’s so good to be planning a proper Fringe again. In August 2020 we went for a wander around the deserted Royal Mile and past empty venues. What were we thinking? Last year was better but it was very odd having a wish list of fifteen shows and seeing them all. Here’s to a laughter filled August!

Edinburgh Castle

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